Cy-Phy Convergence is creating new attack opportunities for cybercriminals: Fortinet

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Cy-Phy Convergence is creating new attack opportunities for cybercriminals: Fortinet

The Convergence of Physical Security and the IP Network is Expanding the Attack Surface, according to the findings of the latest Fortinet quarterly Global Threat Landscape Report. The research reveals that cybercriminals are constantly evolving the sophistication of their attacks—from continuing to exploit the vast insecurity of IoT devices, to morphing open source malware tools into new threats.

“The age of Cy-Phy”—the convergence of cybersecurity things and physical spaces—is here. Although the appeal of this convergence to our digital economy is almost sci-fi in terms of imagination, unfortunately the cybersecurity risks are very real. Cybercriminals are closely watching and developing exploits that target this emerging digital convergence. Fundamental elements of cybersecurity, including visibility, automation, and agile segmentation, are more critical than ever to enable us to thrive in our Cy-Phy digital future, and to protect us against the malicious activities of our cyber adversaries,” says Michael Joseph, Director System Engineering, SAARC, Fortinet.

Half of the top 12 global exploits targeted IoT devices, and four of the top 12 were related to IP-enabled cameras. Ironically, cybercriminals are increasingly targeting security cameras because many lack the requisite network security protocols.

Access to IoT IP cameras could enable cybercriminals to snoop on private interactions, enact malicious onsite activities (e.g., shut off cameras so they can physically access restricted areas), as well as use them as a launching pad to break into cyber systems to launch DDoS attacks, steal proprietary information, initiate a ransomware attack, and more.

The report also highlighted to risks associated with Open source malware tools. Such tools are typically beneficial to the cybersecurity community, enabling teams to test defenses, researchers to analyze exploits, and instructors to use real-life examples. These openware tools are generally available from sharing sites such as GitHub, and as these are available to anyone, adversaries can also access them for nefarious activities.

They are evolving and weaponizing these malware tools into new threats, with ransomware comprising a significant number of them. An example where openware source code has been weaponized is the Mirai IoT botnet. An explosion of variants and activity continues to be catalogued since its release in 2016. For cybercriminals innovation continues to be the land of opportunity.

Images are for reference only.Images gathered automatic from google.All rights on the images are with their original owners.

2019-03-05 20:54:50

Images are for reference only.Images gathered automatic from google.All rights on the images are with their original owners.

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